Goral

Goral (Naemorhedus) They are small ungulates with a goat-like or antelope-like appearance. Gorals are often found on rocky hillsides at high elevations. Gorals typically weigh 25–40 kilograms and are 80–130 centimetres in length, with short, backward-facing horns. Coloration differs between species and individuals, but generally ranges from light gray to dark red-brown, with lighter patches …

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Nilgai

Nilgai (Boselaphus tragocamelus) Nilgai prefer areas with short bushes and scattered trees in scrub forests and grassy plains. They are common in agricultural lands, but hardly occur in dense forest. It stands 1–1.5 metres at the shoulder; the head-and-body length is typically between 1.7–2.1 metres. Herbivores, the Nilgai prefer grasses and herbs; woody plants are …

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Indian Pipistrelle

Indian Pipistrelle (Pipistrellus coromandra) Head and body length is 8-9cm. Forearm is 3cm. Wingspan 19-22cm. Weight 9-13g. Female is larger than male. Generally blackish brown to reddish brown above. Underside brown with a grayish tinge. Wing membrane, face, and ears are blackish brown. Wing membrane has pale margin. Possesses fairly dense and short fur. Muzzle …

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Lesser Noctule

Lesser Noctule (Nyctalus leisleri) It is a medium-sized bat, slightly smaller than the common noctule. The face, ears and wings are dark, the fur is brown. The ears are short and rounded with a mushroom-shaped tragus. The wings are long and narrow. The frequencies used by this bat species for echolocation lie between 25–54 kHz, …

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Leaf-Nosed Bat

Leaf-nosed Bat (Phyllostomidae) The nose-leaf can be adorned with a vertical leaf, a concave upward leaf, or multiple accessory leaves; varying by species. Leaf-nosed bats lack a tail, have triangular-shaped ears that can have pointed or rounded tips,[12] range in body size from 4 cm to 13.5 cm, and a wingspan up to 90 cm …

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Horseshoe Bat

Horseshoe Bat (Rhinolophidae) All horseshoe bats have leaf-like, horseshoe-shaped protuberances called noseleafs on their noses. The noseleafs are important in species identification, and are composed of several parts. The lancet is triangular, pointed, and pocketed, and points up between the bats’ eyes. Their hind limbs are not well developed, so they cannot walk on all …

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Setaria glauca

Setaria glauca (Setaria viridis) Setaria viridis is a species of grass known by many common names, including green foxtail, green bristlegrass, and wild foxtail millet. It is a hardy grass which grows in many types of urban, cultivated, and disturbed habitat, including vacant lots, sidewalks, railroads, lawns, and at the margins of fields. It is …

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Greater Horseshoe Bat

Greater Horseshoe Bat (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum) The greater horseshoe bat is an insectivorous bat of the genus Rhinolophus. It has a distinctive noseleaf, which has a pointed upper part and a horseshoe shaped lower part. Its horseshoe noseleaf helps to focus the ultrasound it uses to ‘see’. The greater horseshoe bat also has tooth and bone …

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Indian Flying Fox

Indian Flying Fox (Pteropus giganteus) The Indian flying fox also known as the greater Indian fruit bat. It is one of the largest bats in the world. It is of interest as a disease vector, as it is capable of transmitting several viruses to humans. It is nocturnal and feeds mainly on ripe fruits, such …

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Fulvous Fruit bat

Fulvous Fruit Bat (Rousettus leschenaultia) Leschenault’s rousette is brown to grey-brown in colour with lighter underparts. It has long pale hairs under the chin, an elongated muzzle and large dark eyes. The head and body length measures 9.5–12 cm, the tail length measures 1–1.8 cm  and the forearm length is about 7.5–8.5 cm. This bat …

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